Act out against racism in everyday life through actions and words.

 

FOLLOW DIVERSE USERS ON SOCIAL MEDIA 

 

Ally Henny, a Christian commentator on race

 

Brittany Packnett Cunningham, co-founder of Campaign Zero, a policy platform to end police violence, and a host of Pod Save The People

 

Candace Andrews, a photographer documenting protests

 

Charlene Carruthers, founder of the Black Youth Project 100

 

Chelsea Vowel, #NativeTwitter influencer and Mé​tis author and academic from Lac Ste. Anne, Alta.

 

Ibram X. Kendi, the author of How To Be An Antiracist and Director of the Antiracism Center

 

@indigenousX, Australian Twitter account where a different Indigenous person in the country hosts each week

 

@indigenousxca, Canadian Twitter account that highlights the diversity of thought and experiences of Indigenous Peoples across Canada

 

Nikkolas Smith, the artist behind portraits of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and others

 

Okwaho Network, a growing online community for Indigenous members from Canada, the United States, Australia and New Zealand

 

Rachel Cargle, a writer and lecturer who explores the intersection between race and womanhood

 

 

EXAMINE YOUR OWN ACTIONS

 

Know what racial harassment is. Racial harassment means that someone is bothering, threatening or treating someone unfairly because of perceived race, color, ancestry, place of origin, ethnic origin, creed and/or citizenship. Racial harassment may be based on a combination of any of these characteristics. It may also be because of things related to these characteristics, such as if you wear clothing related to your background, speak with an accent or practice a certain religion. Sometimes racial harassment doesn’t even involve words or actions directly related to race. It may be that someone is unfairly singling someone else out for humiliating treatment because of their background.

Listen to people who experience racism and lean into awkward conversations.

Use your words carefully and know what words may be offensive:https://www.dictionary.com/e/words-that-are-bad-in-some-contexts/

Talk about people as people and not just numbers.

Talk about what you’re for, as well as what you’re against.

Silence will usually not make racial harassment go away. Speak up for others, and yourself, whenever possible.

Keep your cool. It’s hard to be polite when someone is making offensive comments, but losing your temper will likely embarrass them, which is probably going to make them defensive and shut down the conversation. Holding your temper might mean taking a breather and speaking to them privately later. You will have more of a chance of persuading people if you talk about how their words make you feel rather than yelling at them.

 

 

SPEAK OUT WHEN YOU SEE OFFENSIVE THINGS HAPPENING, SUCH AS:

 

Perpetuation of the “myth of the model minority”. This is the over-generalization of a population, lumping all people from one culture into one big monolith of a people who are all the same. This is simply not true.

Microaggressions and instances of “casual racism”. People should not expect less, or more, from anyone simply because of how they look or what their background is.

Racial slurs or “jokes”. If you witness this, say something. This is never okay.

Making fun of or insulting someone because of their racial identity.

Name calling because of race, colour, citizenship, place of origin, ancestry, ethnic background or creed.

Posting of cartoons or pictures that degrades persons of a particular racial group, or an otherwise poisoned environment.

 

 

SHOW SUPPORT BY SIGNING PETITIONS AND CALLING REPRESENTATIVES

 

Ban the SPVM and Canadian police from using rubber bullets

 

Calling the Ontario Ombudsman to Open a Public Investigation into Racism in Ottawa Schools

 

Justice for Breonna Taylor

 

Justice For Tony McDade

 

Justice For Regis Korchinski-Paquet

 

Justice for Sean Reed

 

Oppose STM officers special constable powers

 

Reclaim the Block

 

Run With Ahmaud

 

Sign the Concordia University Statement on Black Lives (for Students, Staff, Librarians, Professors, Lecturers, Research Fellows, Alumnus/a, and Retired Employees)

 

We Are Done Dying

 

White House Petition 

 

Check out this growing Twitter Thread on petitions to sign.

 

 

DONATE TO GROUPS PROVIDING SUPPORT TO THE BIPOC COMMUNITY

 

Black Visions Collective

Black Visions Collective (BLVC) believes in a future where all Black people have autonomy, safety is community-led, and we are in right relationship within our ecosystems.

DONATE HERE

 

Black Trans Protestors Emergency Fund

A collective of Black trans femmes dedicated to creating space for ourselves in the arts and beyond.

DONATE HERE

 

Centre for the Advancement of African Canadians (Africa Centre)

The Council for Advancement of African Canadians in Alberta (CAAC), operating as Africa Centre, was incorporated in 2006. They the largest pan African organization in western Canada, serving as a community hub that provides programs and services from a place of cultural awareness and competency to the families in our diverse community.

 

Reclaim the Block

Reclaim the Block began in 2018 and organizes the Minneapolis community and city council members to move money from the police department into other areas of the city’s budget that truly promote community health and safety.

DONATE HERE

 

Justice for Regis

“On May 27th, 2020, my sister Regis Korchinski Paquet, tragically lost her life, she was so special and meant the world to us. She was kind, beautiful and she will be missed beyond belief. We are asking the public to help with meeting are goal to get the proper justice we need.”

DONATE HERE

 

Official George Floyd Memorial Fund

Established to cover funeral and burial expenses, mental and grief counseling, lodging and travel for all court proceedings, and to assist the family in the days to come as they continue to seek justice for George.

DONATE HERE

 

Community Bail Funds

Donate to any of the active bail funds on this listing to help end destructive bail practices.

 

  

BUY FROM BLACK AND INDIGENOUS OWNED BOOKSELLERS

 

A Different Booklist (Toronto)

A Canadian multicultural bookstore specializing in literature from the African and caribbean Diaspora and the Global South.

 

Iron Dog Books (Metro Vancouver)

Iron Dog Books is an Indigenous-owned bookshop and book truck dedicated to bringing low cost reading to Tsleil-Waututh, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Musqueam territories.

 

Knowledge Bookstore (Brampton)

Knowledge Bookstore is an independent Afrocentric bookstore that sells African Canadian, African American, Caribbean and Children books. A community space as well as the go to source for parents, writers, poets, artists and the Black community.

 

Massy Books (Vancouver)

Massy Books is 100% Indigenous owned and operated and a member of the Stó:lō Business Association.

 

Strong Nations Gifts, Books, Publishing (British Columbia)

Strong Nations is an online retailer and a publishing house located in Nanaimo, BC, specializing in Indigenous literature and art.

 

 

HIRE BIPOC ORGANIZERS AND BUSINESSES

 

Autonomy Personal Training

Body positive personal training with Ruby Smith-Diaz. Autonomy welcomes and centers the participation of Indigenous people, Black people, People of colour, queer fam, gender binary breakers, radicals, and beyond- in any shape and at every size. Your body is yours; no one can take away your autonomy.

 

Breathing Space Creative

Artist and writer care consulting firm founded by Chelene Knight. Artist care rooted in building resilience, community and trust through authentic communication.

 

Cicely Blain Consulting

Diversity and inclusion consulting firm that cares about you and your clients. Committed to making organizations more diverse and equal. Founded by Cicely Blain.